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AdriaPecoraStudio@gmail.com



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About the artist
Adria Pecora (born, 1965, Newark, NJ) is a visual artist currently living in the American Southwest. Grounded in lyrical abstraction, her paintings bridge geometric and gestural idioms, deploying a nuanced formal vocabulary to articulate a complex style informed by language and the intrinsic properties of material. 

Adria studied art and French at Skidmore College and received her BS in 1987. She attended School of the Art Institute of Chicago under the auspices of a Trustee Scholarship and obtained the MFA in 1991. Adria taught at Skidmore and New York University and worked for a non-profit organization that supported at-risk youth with arts mentoring and college scholarships. Grounded in social issues such as tolerance, the mentoring program produced public art that was featured in a post 9/11 exhibit by Creative Time and profiled in Metropolis. In an administrative role at Cooper Union, Adria organized exhibits and lectures and founded initiatives including a summer residency. She worked with Vito Acconci to realize a publication of his writings in recognition of his tenure as Robert Gwathmey Chair in Architecture and Art.  Through her role overseeing School of Art facilities, she was a core consultant to Morphosis in regards to 41 Cooper Square.

Adria’s interest in art was fostered during childhood by a friend's parents, the painters Alfred Jensen and Regina Bogat. During college she studied with Jeff Elgin, David Miller, Robert Boyers and Harry F. Gaugh and was encouraged by lecturers, Dorothy Dehner and Dore Ashton to study abroad in France where she attended the University of Paris and the painting atelier of Pierre Matthey de l'Etang at the National School of Fine Arts (ENSBA). Her influences at the Art Institute included Colin Westerbeck and visiting artists, Joan Fontcuberta, John Torreano and Tim Rollins.

In 2005, Adria relocated to Phoenix, Arizona to continue support of underserved students at the Maricopa Community Colleges. There, in addition to teaching, Adria advanced her artistic pursuits, exhibiting at museums and alternative spaces.
Adria’s work has recently been exhibited at Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art in Unapologetic: All Women, All Year, 2020. It has been shown at the Phoenix Art Museum and in a tribute to Sol LeWitt at MassMoCA. Solo exhibitions include, Everything I don't want you to know about me, 2011; Exchanges, 2010; Feedback, 2009; and Nets, 2007. 

In 2017, Adria participated in a seminar led by Faisal Devji at the School of Criticism and Theory at Cornell University. Several years prior, she attended a masterclass held by Jorinde Voigt at Autocenter in Berlin and studied generative art at UC Berkeley while in residence at the Kala Art Institute. Adria held additional residencies at Santa Fe Art Institute (fellowship supported by the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, 2008) and Contemporary Artists Center, North Adams (grant ajudicated by Thomas Krens and Walter Hopps, 1996). She is the recipient of a grant from the Contemporary Forum at the Phoenix Art Museum (2010); and a traveling fellowship by School of the Art Institute of Chicago (1991). Commissions include a temporary public art project for the City of Phoenix (2007). Adria’s work is represented in the collections of Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art; Kala Art Institute; Santa Fe Art Institute; Skidmore College; and Franklin Furnace artist book collection at MoMA/PS 1.




Artist statement
My work speaks to personal experience while seeking dialogue with historical examples. I tend to organize it into distinct bodies governed by particular themes, materials, and processes.
I am interested in evoking experiences that are equally sensual and intellectual. I reflect on the human condition, the urban environment and the passage of time. Themes include entropy, loss, and obsolescence.
Current work incorporates motifs of entrenchment and evanescence through processes of mark-making, writing, engraving, erasure, and veiling.











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